Two female runners in club kit smile next to a sign denoting the start of the Pennine Way

Over the weekend of Friday 21st – Sunday 23rd June Rochdale Harriers & AC ran the 268
mile length of the Pennine Way, North to South, starting in Kirk Yetholm and finishing in
Edale.

Over 40 members of the club took to the trails, moorland and farmland across England’s rocky spine as they ran a continuous 24-leg relay throughout the day and night covering varying distances and elevations, with some runners even volunteering for double shifts!
The club chose to fundraise and support the Rossendale and Pendle Mountain Rescue
Service for the adventure and at the time of writing had exceeded £1,800 of donations for
the organisation.

Mountain Rescue is an entirely voluntary team providing an amazing service supporting
many of the club’s and the wider running communities events and races. They will assist the emergency services with casualty care, missing person searches and extractions often in the worst of weather conditions in some of the remotest parts of our moors, and like many services are only really appreciated at the most unfortunate and seemingly helpless of times when truly needed.

Through nine counties and three national parks, from the boggy moorlands of Northern
England, over the spectacular limestone pavement of Malham and so much in between, the weekend challenged the Rochdale runners but an amazing team spirit and willingness to help each other pushed them to the finish at 18:38 on Sunday.

Rochdale Harriers’ committee member and one of the chief organisers John Mayall
described the event saying, “We first had the idea of running the Pennine Way on a long
Sunday run.

“At the time we thought it would be impossible due to the distances involved and the number of runners needed but the way the club has pulled together has been amazing. Everyone wanted it to be a success, it’s been a group of ordinary people doing something
extraordinary.

“We aren’t the biggest club and we aren’t the fastest club but when it comes to team spirit and camaraderie I think you’d struggle to find a better club!”

Nick Barton, Rochdale Harriers Chairman, added, “It’s a great idea that has grown over the year it took to plan. It’s brought together people who have been in the club for years and those who have only joined recently across all different running abilities.

“The runners have really challenged themselves and embraced the adventure!”

Rochdale Harriers have a rich history dating back to 1894 and are an accommodating and
welcoming club who organise local races throughout the year. The club run training nights
twice a week open to all, and anyone who might want to start, get back into running or
continue pushing for PBs are encouraged to get in touch!

More information can be found on the clubs website rochdaleharriers.org.uk or through the club’s social media channels.